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Grass cutting in Ipswich

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The maintenance of grassed areas in public open spaces and housing areas is undertaken by Ipswich Borough Council.

The Council also carries out grass cutting on highway verges in Ipswich on behalf of Suffolk County Council.

Highways verges - cutting schedule

Suffolk County Council contract the maintenance of the highway verges in Ipswich to the Borough Council to cut the verges three times a year, but a further seven cuts are carried out by the Borough Council, making a total of 10 cuts a year at intervals of approximately 3.5 weeks. The grass-cutting season takes place between mid-March and mid-October. The grass cutting for 2018 began week commencing 12th March.

There might be some variation to the schedule due to the weather and subsequent growth conditions but most areas will receive a cut every 3.5 weeks.

Ipswich is split up into three areas for highway verge cutting and the order of cutting within each is shown within the table below:

 East Ipswich    

 West Ipswich   

 South Ipswich     

Priory HeathCastle HillChantry
GainsboroughWhitehouseStoke Park
HolywellsWhitton
BixleyWherstead
Rushmere
St Margaret’s


Highway hedges - cutting schedule

The hedges are cut back once a year at the end of the bird nesting season, from September through to the following February. The areas covered are:

  • Thurleston Lane
  • London Road
  • Humber Doucy Lane
  • Westerfield Road
  • Whitton Church Lane
  • Tuddenham Road
  • Cemetery Lane/Belverdere Road

Other mown areas

Areas such as parks and open spaces and garden areas in and around Council-owned housing are targeted to be cut 17 times from March to October at approximately fortnightly intervals (10-12 working days) depending on the weather, ground and growing conditions.

Relaxed mowing regimes have been implemented on many highways, parks and housing areas for the benefit of bees, pollinating insects and other wildlife. Recent legislation, policy and guidance require councils to create new habitats, protect pollinators and promote biodiversity on its land. Our town is at the forefront of the national movement to promote wildlife though the Ipswich Wildlife Network.

Overgrown areas

In the peak growth season (May – July), it is expected that some grassed areas will become overgrown in between scheduled cuts, especially if there are flushes of growth in spells of wet weather.

At this time of year, especially in spring and early summer, it might seem as though some grassed areas are being neglected. However, this not the case and we are continuing to cut all grass according to the regimes above.

There has not been a reduction in the amount of resources provided for grass cutting and additional resources are applied during peak season. Due to the size of the town and the speed of growth in peak season, especially following wet weather, there will always be some areas which become overly long, irrespective of resources.

We do not collect grass cuttings (known as arisings) on verges, communal areas or open spaces as they break down to provide a sustainable food source for the grass sward. When long grass is cut, the arisings can be more visible for a short time. However, these quickly break down and do not damage the grass growing underneath.

Missed areas

Ipswich has many parks and open spaces, housing land and highway verges to cover and while our grounds maintenance teams work hard to cut as much grass as possible, areas may occasionally be missed. If you feel an area of grass has not been cut when nearby areas have, please contact us.

Cemeteries and churchyards

Wherever the Council has responsibility for maintenance of cemeteries, the grass will be cut as follows:

The Lawn and Millennium cemeteries will be maintained 10-12 times a year, whilst the Old and New Cemeteries cutting and strimming will be carried out on a monthly basis. There are areas that are kept as conservation areas, where the grass is deliberately left longer to support wildlife.

It is not felt appropriate to use herbicides on grassed areas around memorials and preference to maintain the grass through mowing and strimming. Occasionally, grass cuttings (arisings) do fall on to memorials especially when the grass is cut when wet. While we try to keep this to a minimum, it is sometimes unavoidable.

Contact Details

Parks & Cemeteries,
Ipswich Borough Council,
3E Grafton House,
15 - 17 Russell Road,
Ipswich,
IP1 2DE

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01473 433512